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The client organization

Moreover, these strategies are most cases recommended by the various practitioners in the field of human resource management. Such practitioners credibility depends mostly on their previous relationships with the client organization and in some cases may be dependent only on a word of mouth. The management should take the mandate of inquiring as to the credibility of such practitioners before contracting with them and this could be done through the help of marketing literature such as those that list client companies and those that contain descriptions of the achievements with the previous clients.

This will require the management to collect enough evidence that can be used to back the decision of contracting a certain practitioner (Randall, 1992, p. 20). The ambiguity brought about by intentional discrimination of the work force such as in individual pay for performance on one had and the benevolent nature of the service offered by various practitioners on the other had can be significantly reduce through employment of research by human resource managers on one extreme and by the respective practitioners on the other end.

For the management to be able to establish the link between the different predictors of performance and the different forms of performance indicators, the management need to conduct extensive research on the needs and the goals of the organization and how best such goals can be achieved. This will help in raising selection of the personnel from the notion of technology to that of science (Sparrow, Harris, 2004, p. 34).

Another issue that would attract the use of evidence based practice in human management is training. This is not as much researched as selection and assessment in many organizations today. However, organizations should conduct research on training not in the light of questions as to whether or not the various kinds of training are useful but in the light of under what conditions and circumstance are these forms of training likely to work.

For example, the management should seek and apply evidence as under which circumstance will instructional versus experiential or formal and informal forms of training is more or less effective. It is a common strategy today for training researchers to contract practitioners to become evaluators and researchers themselves. This they do by first establishing clearly what their specific training needs are and what such training is intended to achieve in the long run. They also specify the expected design of the training that is compatible with the expected results.

In essence, only a few of the existing organizations takes their time in going through all these despite the fact that research is needed in evaluating the undertaken training against the set outcomes and the expected results from such training. On the other hand, most of the organizations today have tended to implement training programs that are based on little or no analysis tending to judge the effectiveness of the resultant training based on the reaction of the trainees to the training program (Clark, Grant, 1999, p.

28). As stated earlier in the ongoing discussion, human management can be seen as strategic approach to the management of the human resource in terms of people in line with the set organizational goals and in the light of external contingencies. This is achieved through the use of a combination of techniques. In this context, research in training strategy has been seen as the most important among other researches and has dominated much of management literature even up to today.

For example, a strategic decision by the management of an organization to make the organization more customer-focused will imply various implications for all other activities in the human resource management sector. Such activities include selection, training, assessment, reward systems and job design among others. Conceptually therefore, research in human resource management will help answer questions about the overall effectiveness of any given technique and also questions as to whether the human capital management as a general coordinated activity is effective (Timothy, Derek, 1999, p. 37).