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Productivity Gains at Whirlpool

Way back before 1980s when Whirlpool Appliance’s Benton Harbor Plant in Michigan is not productive, the dilemma lies in the management itself. What is wrong with the company’s leaders? If productivity and quality are not good, it has something to do with the labor. Definitely, labor management relation is not also good so it does affect the production and quality control of the products. How does the management manage the company per se—their employees, their products, their organizational structure? It is as if they just sit on their chairs, stare at the ceiling, and do nothing with their company’s problem.

There are several assumptions why the company has been unproductive during those times. First, the management may be authoritarian and unapproachable; hence the employees are scared to approach them regarding the defective parts of the machine and regarding their personal issues and concerns with the company. Second, the management probably does not invite criticisms, opinions and violent reactions by the way they handle and administer the company. So as a result, employees shut their mouth and work just like the machines. However, a metamorphosis has blasted during the late 1980s.

A lot of assumptions can also be drawn. First, the management has figured out the reasons for all those dilemmas that have been encountered. Second, someone has taken an action, spoke up and broke the ice regarding the company’s situation and the possible and feasible effects and risks on the company itself and on the employees. Third, there might be a change in the management—change of leaders. Definitely, it is the management and the employees efforts why the company has changed its situation. They have realized their potentials and responsibilities.

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